The frequency of your exterior repainting depends on several factors, including where you live, what your house is made out of, and what it was painted with. In North Texas, we’re protected from the salt sprays our coastal friends down south must consider. Even still, strong sunshine and excessive heat during the summer can take a serious toll on the life of your paint. Dark, oil-based paints may fade especially quickly. The paint may blister, too, or form bubbles on the surface. So there’s no concrete answer for how often to repaint your home — but if you start to see chips, cracks, bleaching, blistering, or any other issue that takes away from the appearance of your home, it’s time to consider repainting.

Follow the shade. When you are painting the exterior of your home, you would be wise to follow the shade from your house and avoid the sun. As the sun moves around your house, try to avoid the sun as much as possible because you may become overheated with the sun beating down on you, and painting in direct sunlight (depending on the heat of the day) is not good for the application process and can cause bubbling/adhesion issues. By moving with the shade, you minimize these potential problems.
When painting outside, it is always best to check the tin for the minimum/maximum temperatures. You must also take into account chill factors, especially on metal, as this can reduce surface temperatures considerably. From a health and safety perspective, there isn't a specific minimum or maximum temperature for a worker to paint in. Dress appropriately and stay ventilated/hydrated.
Paint sheen is determined by the ratio of resins and binders to pigment levels in the paint. Paints with a high level of resins/binders create a high-sheen, shiny surface, while those where the pigment levels are high, create a less reflective surface. Generally speaking, glossier paints are more durable, while flatter paints are less resilient but cover better. 

Beware of lead paint! Some houses that were built before 1978 have paint on them that may contain traces of lead. Exposure to lead paint can cause anaemia, learning disabilities in children and damage to the brain and nervous system. When working on the exterior of your historic home (older than 1960), be sure that you observe the proper safety measures including:


The BEHR PREMIUM PLUS 2 gal. Flat Interior The BEHR PREMIUM PLUS 2 gal. Flat Interior Ceiling Paint is designed for use on textured popcorn and acoustic-style ceilings. This splatter-resistant paint offers great hiding performance for coverage of up to 800 sq. ft. Its mildew-resistant finish helps ensure that the matte sheen lasts over time.  More + Product Details Close
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