#3 Plastic sheets are the most popular items for protecting shrubs and windows as well as other structures while the painting job is on. But you should think about a onetime investment to keep things economic, simple and more effective. You should choose canvas instead of plastic sheets. They will serve you longer and do a better job of protection. They will also provide with better safety.

When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
#1 You should pay attention to preparing the surfaces first making sure repairs take place prior to painting. It's not the fun part of the task, rather it's the most important part of painting. If you fail to prepare the surface, no matter how exclusive painting material you're using, it'll fail. Make sure there is no peeling paint left on wood and use the proper caulk for cracks along the trimwork and other small holes.
Paint sheen is determined by the ratio of resins and binders to pigment levels in the paint. Paints with a high level of resins/binders create a high-sheen, shiny surface, while those where the pigment levels are high, create a less reflective surface. Generally speaking, glossier paints are more durable, while flatter paints are less resilient but cover better. 
The frequency of your exterior repainting depends on several factors, including where you live, what your house is made out of, and what it was painted with. In North Texas, we’re protected from the salt sprays our coastal friends down south must consider. Even still, strong sunshine and excessive heat during the summer can take a serious toll on the life of your paint. Dark, oil-based paints may fade especially quickly. The paint may blister, too, or form bubbles on the surface. So there’s no concrete answer for how often to repaint your home — but if you start to see chips, cracks, bleaching, blistering, or any other issue that takes away from the appearance of your home, it’s time to consider repainting.
Follow the shade. When you are painting the exterior of your home, you would be wise to follow the shade from your house and avoid the sun. As the sun moves around your house, try to avoid the sun as much as possible because you may become overheated with the sun beating down on you, and painting in direct sunlight (depending on the heat of the day) is not good for the application process and can cause bubbling/adhesion issues. By moving with the shade, you minimize these potential problems.
Follow the shade. When you are painting the exterior of your home, you would be wise to follow the shade from your house and avoid the sun. As the sun moves around your house, try to avoid the sun as much as possible because you may become overheated with the sun beating down on you, and painting in direct sunlight (depending on the heat of the day) is not good for the application process and can cause bubbling/adhesion issues. By moving with the shade, you minimize these potential problems.
#1 You should pay attention to preparing the surfaces first making sure repairs take place prior to painting. It's not the fun part of the task, rather it's the most important part of painting. If you fail to prepare the surface, no matter how exclusive painting material you're using, it'll fail. Make sure there is no peeling paint left on wood and use the proper caulk for cracks along the trimwork and other small holes.
BEHR Premium Cabinet and Trim Interior Semi-Gloss Enamel BEHR Premium Cabinet and Trim Interior Semi-Gloss Enamel offers excellent flow and leveling and dries to a hard, durable finish. Its outstanding block resistance allows for quick return to service, making it ideal for use on cabinets, trim, doors, windows, shutters and woodwork. This product can also be used on other properly prepared and primed substrates, such as drywall, masonry and metal.  More + Product Details Close
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