Beware of lead paint! Some houses that were built before 1978 have paint on them that may contain traces of lead. Exposure to lead paint can cause anaemia, learning disabilities in children and damage to the brain and nervous system. When working on the exterior of your historic home (older than 1960), be sure that you observe the proper safety measures including:
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The frequency of your exterior repainting depends on several factors, including where you live, what your house is made out of, and what it was painted with. In North Texas, we’re protected from the salt sprays our coastal friends down south must consider. Even still, strong sunshine and excessive heat during the summer can take a serious toll on the life of your paint. Dark, oil-based paints may fade especially quickly. The paint may blister, too, or form bubbles on the surface. So there’s no concrete answer for how often to repaint your home — but if you start to see chips, cracks, bleaching, blistering, or any other issue that takes away from the appearance of your home, it’s time to consider repainting.

Satin paints require a bit more care during application in order to avoid lap marks. As with interior painting, it is important to keep a wet edge during application. It is important that satin paints be thoroughly mixed before application to keep the resins and pigments in uniform ratio throughout the can. Satin paints should be mixed just before every painting session.

After a while, painted houses start to reveal wear and tear, so once in a while, doing a refreshing exterior house-painting project can bring back your home’s vibrancy. There is a lot of preparation work required for repainting a house but it's important to not skip this part because it makes the painting work much easier and ensures that the paintwork endures and stays in great condition.
Walls should be wet down before getting scrubbed, then washed with a gallon of water mixed with 1 cup chlorine bleach and 1 cup of either a concentrated, phosphate-free cleaner, such as a trisodium phosphate (TSP) substitute, or Jomax House Cleaner. Working in sections, from the bottom to the top, will avoid streaks. Be sure to rinse walls well before the solution dries. Wood siding and trim should be ready to paint after a day or two of dry weather.
#4 You have to be very careful about choosing the accessories. You should find something resourceful, easy-to-use and more effective. As an example, you should find a suitable extension pole instead of the ladders. These extension poles will help you paint the surface from a closer distance and will allow painting the surface more precisely. Also, you should find painting grids instead of the popular trays. Before you start, you should arrange all the items you might need while painting.
Start at the top of your house and work your way down. This serves two purposes. First, it allows you go down the ladder instead of up as you work, preventing potentially life threatening falls. Also, when prepping/scraping the paint off, you will have debris falling on the bottom areas that you just painted. Second, painting from top to bottom prevents messy drips and missed spots. Ideally, you should also start painting from the left side and work your way right because you are more likely to see any missed spots.[8]

The frequency of your exterior repainting depends on several factors, including where you live, what your house is made out of, and what it was painted with. In North Texas, we’re protected from the salt sprays our coastal friends down south must consider. Even still, strong sunshine and excessive heat during the summer can take a serious toll on the life of your paint. Dark, oil-based paints may fade especially quickly. The paint may blister, too, or form bubbles on the surface. So there’s no concrete answer for how often to repaint your home — but if you start to see chips, cracks, bleaching, blistering, or any other issue that takes away from the appearance of your home, it’s time to consider repainting.

The BEHR PREMIUM PLUS Ceiling Paint 1 gal. The BEHR PREMIUM PLUS Ceiling Paint 1 gal. features a durable, acrylic-latex formula that is specifically designed for use on previously painted or primed interior ceilings. This spatter resistant formula minimizes glare and provides a mildew-resistant finish. This formula also maintains the original acoustical ceiling properties.  More + Product Details Close
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