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O'Neil patches shallow holes and divots with Ready Patch because it dries fast, sands smooth, and stays flexible. Deep cracks and rotten spots are best repaired with two-step epoxies, such as those made by Advanced Repair Technology. (For a step-by-step instructions, see Repairing Rot with Epoxy.) The days of using polyester auto-body fillers on wood are over. "They cure too hard," says Portland, Oregon–based painting contractor Kathleen George. "They look good at first, but then they peel away."
Sure, your exterior repainting job may sound like a good project. But we want to remind you that it’s always best to trust the professionals who know best when you’re embarking on a home paint job. Especially one that’s as significant as the exterior of your home. We see the carnage left behind by hasty, DIY paint jobs too often. When you trust an experienced, professional painting company, you’ll benefit from a team of experts who will get the job done right the very first time.
The frequency of your exterior repainting depends on several factors, including where you live, what your house is made out of, and what it was painted with. In North Texas, we’re protected from the salt sprays our coastal friends down south must consider. Even still, strong sunshine and excessive heat during the summer can take a serious toll on the life of your paint. Dark, oil-based paints may fade especially quickly. The paint may blister, too, or form bubbles on the surface. So there’s no concrete answer for how often to repaint your home — but if you start to see chips, cracks, bleaching, blistering, or any other issue that takes away from the appearance of your home, it’s time to consider repainting.
Caulk and seal any windows or openings to prevent air and water from leaking in. This may be the most important part of the prepping process. It's important to have a well-maintained, beautified, non-rotting wood house, but it's just as important to make sure that the windows, cracks and openings aren't leaking air or letting in water, which can ruin the interior of your house. Depending on the severity of the deterioration, you can even resort to using a heavy duty, professional grade, industrial caulking.[6]
By clicking Confirm Appointment, you affirm you have read and agree to the HomeAdvisor Terms & Conditions, and you agree and authorize HomeAdvisor and its affiliates, and their networks of Service Professionals, to deliver marketing calls or texts using automated technology to the number you provided above regarding your project and other home services offers. Consent is not a condition of purchase.
Give your fireplace mantle an accent paint color, as this adds a quick update without having to tear anything out. In the kitchen, give your cabinets a new look with a douse of kitchen cabinet paint for an affordable and satisfying update. Countertop paint makes kitchen countertops look new again. You can do it yourself with a countertop paint kit in less than a weekend. A worn-out bathtub can look new with a coating of bathtub paint. Even your tiles can get a refresh or touch up, try tile paint on your backsplash or shower. Pro-tip: Use semi-gloss paint for kitchens and bathrooms as they wipe down easily.
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